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23rd October 2018 

About Therapy

Many of our difficulties develop as a result of our early experience. We repeat patterns in our lives in the hope that things will one day turn out differently. Therapy offers you the possibility of insight into these patterns.

Counselling is generally considered a relatively short-term option where a specific problem may be looked at over a period of a few weeks or a few months. This might be a problem at work, a one-off relationship difficulty or a recent bereavement.

Or it may be a marriage or partnership issue where outmoded patterns of relating and communicating need to be interrupted and redirected. Sometimes in six to eight sessions couples can find effective ways of problem solving and interacting.

Psychotherapy is a longer-term option with the intention of making sense of chronic difficulties such as mood swings and anxious feelings, destructive relationship patterns, drug and alcohol misuse or problems with food.

Practical Information
Counselling and psychotherapy both work on the principle of regular contact, which is usually weekly. Psychotherapy might involve more than one appointment a week but this is optional and based on the specific needs of the individual.

Sessions are generally held at the same time each week and last fifty minutes, sixty minutes for couples. My charge is 50 for a single session, and 60 for couples. I charge the same amounts for assessments and cancellations.

The decision whether or not to go ahead is based on an initial, mutual assessment session. This gives me a chance to see whether or not I believe I am an appropriate person to help you and it gives you a chance to determine whether I am someone you feel comfortable enough to work with.

I am an accredited member of the British Association of Counselling and Psychotherapy (BACP), of the United Kingdom Register of Counsellors (UKRC), and a registered member of the United Kingdom Council of Psychotherapy (UKCP). I am also a member of the Metanoia Institute (MPTI). I adhere to all their code of ethics and bound by their complaints procedures.

An important aspect of any psychotherapeutic relationship is confidentiality. It is an important premise that unless you are in danger of hurting yourself or someone else, or I am compelled by a court of law, confidentiality will be maintained.

Any therapist working within the ethical frameworks of the BACP, the UKRC, the UKCP, and MPTI also has a professional obligation to maintain an ongoing programme of professional development. This includes consultation on a regular basis with an experienced practitioner to ensure that the highest ethical standards are maintained.